Yakima River Summer Fishing In Full Swing!

Not a lot has changed since our last report, except the air temps are starting to look like what we typically see in July: mid-to-upper 90's with overnight lows up close to 60 degrees. What does this mean for you, the angler? It means fishing early and late, and leaving the middle of the day to the tubers. Sure you can nymph up some fish during the middle of the day, but summer time is dry-fly season, and there are some great opportunities to catch fish on top on the edges of the day.

During the morning hours, the fish are looking up for stonefly imitations for the most part, so flies like Chubby Chernobyls, PMXs, and Stimulators will be solid producers, with sizes #10-12 being the most productive. As far as color goes, don't be afraid to mix it up. While summer stones are tan in color, purple, red, orange and royal are all proven producers this time of year. In the evening, the previously mentioned big dry-flies will fish well, along with a number of patterns that imtitate our evening caddis hatches. If the fish are looking up for caddisflies, an elk hair in #14-16 trailed by a cdc emerger is pretty hard to beat.

We hope to see you out on the water early or late, and whatever time you choose to fish, don't forget to drink lots of water and stay up on the sunscreen! Have a fishy week folks!

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Yakima River Fishing Report

Sorry for the lapse in reports, we've been spending a lot of time on the water, and not a whole lot of time in front of the screen lately...that should tell you something about how the fishing has been. At the risk of sounding like a broken record, I will say that the fishing has been pretty awesome lately, with some great dry-fly activity early and late. While there are some fish up eating big dries in the morning hours, our guides are having more consistent success in the evening. Caddis as well as short-wing stoneflies have the fish looking up most nights, and either an elk hair trailed by a cdc emerger, or a chubby in purple or tan trailed by an elk hair are putting fish in the net.

Although we will have plenty of dry-fly opportunities throughout the summer, early in July offers you a shot at fish that have not been pounded on night after night. Not that these fish are dumb or pushovers by any means, just a little more "opportunistic" than they will be come mid-August. Long story short, there is no bad time to go fishing, and the next few weeks are looking particularily appealing. See you out here.

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Fifth of July Fishing Report

We hope everyone had a fun and safe Fourth of July spent with family and friends. Lots of BBQing, drinking beer and fishing for our guide staff, with plenty of excitement about the summer fishing to come. It looks like we are going to finally start seeing some warmer weather around here, and with the full moon cycle over with for awhile, the fishing in the mornings and the evenings should start to become more consistent. Granted, the dry-fly bite was pretty good overall for most of June, but less wind and warmer temps will be welcomed by both bugs and anglers.

Shallow nymphing and dry-dropper fishing has been improving with a recent bump in flows, which has pushed the fish nearer the banks and out of the deeper mid-river buckets and slots. Lightning Bugs, Hare's Ear variants, Psycho Princes, and Pat's Rubberlegs fished under an indicator a chubby should get plenty of attentio midday. In the mornings and evenings, stoneflies and caddis are still ruling the show. Now that the fish have seen a steady stream of purple Chubbies, mixing up your pattern to something a little more subtle can payoff. Clodhoppers, Half Chernobyls, PMXs, and Stimis in #10-12 are all great options and dropping an elk hair caddis or CDC emerger off the back of your big dry can pick off some of those fish looking for caddis.

With all of the fun fishing happening on the Yakima, don't forget about some of our smaller tributary streams! The Naches will be dropping into wadeable shape here in the next week or two, along with many other tributary streams and creeks that have already been fishing well. No need to get super techy on small water, just a samll box of dries, a spool of tippet and some floatant should be all you need! Wherever you fish, get out there and have fun! Summer fishing is upon us!

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